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Photos

Connecticut Daughters at Associate Council April, 2017
L to R Ida Ransom, Betty Oderwald, Linda Shabo and Valerie Chase

Elizabeth (Betty) Oderwald
being installed as Honorary Vice-President National
by President National Jacque-Lynne Amann Schulman

TO SEE MORE PHOTOS TAKEN AT ASSOCIATE COUNCIL in April 2017 Click Here


CT April 2017

Valerie Chase with Betty Oderwald at Associate Council Banquet
1812 Period Dress worn by Valerie Chase is modeled after
dress worn by Dollie Madison, wife of President James Madison.


President Valarie Chase and Historian Betty Oderwald
Donate Paintings of the Historic Fairfield, Ct Powder House
at Associate Council. Pen and Pencil Drawing is by Robert Weeks

For More Photos Connecticut Daughters At Associate Council April 2016 Click Here

For Photos of Tree Planting Click Here

Sketch of Fairfield Green featuring historic War of 1812 Tree as it appeared ca. 1815

 

Planting of Peace Tree on Fairfield Green
written by Betty Oderwald Ct Historian
April 25, 2015
On a blustery February 25th 1815, a six year old girl and her grandfather walked to the Green to see a hub-bub of activities to celebrate peace.  Peace would mean that Mary Ann’s father would return to sea as a ship’s captain, Uncle Ephraim, an impressed seaman, would return, and the uncertainty and fear of a British raid would vanish.
There was a cannon salute from Fort Union, an oxen roasting in a pit dug into the Green, a “float” carrying a boat trimmed with red, white, and blue, with flags of England, Spain, France, Italy, Portugal and other countries.  There was a half barrel of special donuts for the children made by Miss Polly Hobart.
Huzzas rang out!
In the evening, Mary Ann and her father, Captain Abraham Gould Jennings, walked to the Town Green to see the illumination.  This was a structure, upright on the green.  It represented a ship’s mast and had extended arms.  At the end of each arm, was a half barrel of tar.  All the barrels were lit and flaming reflecting the happy faces of neighbors and friends.
And standing on the Green,  was a sycamore tree.  That sycamore stood proud and stately until Hurricane Sandy came visiting.  The tree was severely damaged and taken down.   The tree was listed as a Connecticut Notable Tree and called the 1812 tree.
The Connecticut Society, N.S.U.S.D of 1812, dedicated a young replacement sycamore tree on Fairfield Town Green.  Yellow roses were placed at the base of the tree to remember the Treaty of Ghent.